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RunningJupIsland

Prior to my surgery last year, almost to the day…. I was under the impression that as long as I balanced the good with the bad I would be fine.  If I ate 20 chicken wings and a pitcher of beer for dinner I would go for a long run the next day.  If I ate a big steak I would make sure I had a huge salad.  The problem is that this approach does not work.  If it did then my weight would not have gone from 200 to 235 pds in 5 years.

Let me put it this way.  You cannot exercise your way out of chronic disease.  Unless you are Michael Phelps, burning 10,000 calories a day, you will not be able to exercise off the calories you take in.  To really lose weight and reach your ideal body size you have to eat the right foods.  By eliminating Dairy & Animal Protein and avoiding Oil, you can drastically reduce the amount of fat you take in.

The point is eat the right stuff, then exercise.  You will be amazed by the results.

My plaque is reversing after only 8 months on a plant based, low oil approach.  My results from my latest carotid artery sonogram here:

http://wholefed.org/2012/05/03/reversing-plaque-maybe-its-the-aluminium-foil-hat-i-made/

“The most powerful determinant of your dietary intake is your energy expenditure,” says Steven Gortmaker, who heads Harvard’s Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity. “If you’re more physically active, you’re going to get hungry and eat more.” Gortmaker, who has studied childhood obesity, is even suspicious of the playgrounds at fast-food restaurants. “Why would they build those?” he asks. “I know it sounds kind of like conspiracy theory, but you have to think, if a kid plays five minutes and burns 50 calories, he might then go inside and consume 500 calories or even 1,000.”

John Cloud had a great article in Time Magazine a few years ago, Why Exercise Won’t Make You Thin.

“There’s also growing evidence that when it comes to preventing certain diseases, losing weight may be more important than improving cardiovascular health. In June, Northwestern University researchers released the results of the longest observational study ever to investigate the relationship between aerobic fitness and the development of diabetes. The results? Being aerobically fit was far less important than having a normal body mass index in preventing the disease. And as we have seen, exercise often does little to help heavy people reach a normal weight.

So why does the belief persist that exercise leads to weight loss, given all the scientific evidence to the contrary? Interestingly, until the 1970s, few obesity researchers promoted exercise as critical for weight reduction. As recently as 1992, when a stout Bill Clinton became famous for his jogging and McDonald’s habits, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published an article that began, “Recently, the interest in the potential of adding exercise to the treatment of obesity has increased.” The article went on to note that incorporating exercise training into obesity treatment had led to “inconsistent” results. “The increased energy expenditure obtained by training may be compensated by a decrease in non-training physical activities,” the authors wrote.

Then how did the exercise-to-lose-weight mantra become so ingrained? Public-health officials have been reluctant to downplay exercise because those who are more physically active are, overall, healthier. Plus, it’s hard even for experts to renounce the notion that exercise is essential for weight loss. For years, psychologist Kelly Brownell ran a lab at Yale that treated obese patients with the standard, drilled-into-your-head combination of more exercise and less food. “What we found was that the treatment of obesity was very frustrating,” he says. Only about 5% of participants could keep the weight off, and although those 5% were more likely to exercise than those who got fat again, Brownell says if he were running the program today, “I would probably reorient toward food and away from exercise.” In 2005, Brownell co-founded Yale’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, which focuses on food marketing and public policy — not on encouraging more exercise.

Some research has found that the obese already “exercise” more than most of the rest of us. In May, Dr. Arn Eliasson of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center reported the results of a small study that found that overweight people actually expend significantly more calories every day than people of normal weight — 3,064 vs. 2,080. He isn’t the first researcher to reach this conclusion. As science writer Gary Taubes noted in his 2007 book Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health, “The obese tend to expend more energy than lean people of comparable height, sex, and bone structure, which means their metabolism is typically burning off more calories rather than less.”

In short, it’s what you eat, not how hard you try to work it off, that matters more in losing weight. You should exercise to improve your health, but be warned: fiery spurts of vigorous exercise could lead to weight gain. I love how exercise makes me feel, but tomorrow I might skip the VersaClimber — and skip the blueberry bar that is my usual postexercise reward.”
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1914974,00.html#ixzz1p76lTFla

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